The Resource Page will allow partners to contribute and share white papers, fact sheets, communication tools, and other policy analysis with members of the site. The goal is for this page to serve as a Southern resource hub, showcasing the collective knowledge of our members on social justice and equity issues. If you have resources you would like to have added here, please email vmeyer@southerneducation.org. Use the search function of this page to find resources by category.

LOW INCOME STUDENTS NOW A MAJORITY

(2015, Southern Education Foundation) The nation follows the South with low income students becoming a majority of public school students in 2013:

http://www.southerneducation.org/Our-Strategies/Research-and-Publications/New-Majority-Diverse-Majority-Report-Series/A-New-Majority-2015-Update-Low-Income-Students-Now.aspx

What does this mean for public education?  Take the conversation to our forum!

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FROM PLAYGROUNDS TO PRISONS

(2014, Arkansas Advocate for Children and Families) From Playgrounds to Prisons: an Updated Look At School-Based Arrests in Arkansas. The data show that the majority of children in the state of Arkansas affected by school policing are arrested for nonviolent offenses. This finding is consistent with the nationwide trends.

http://www.aradvocates.org/wp-content/uploads/Playgrounds-to-Prisons-December-2014.pdf

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IN NEW ORLEANS

(2015) The Stanford Center for Opportunity in Education released a new research brief, finding that the state-run Recovery School District in New Orleans, which has been operating for a decade, has created a set of schools that are highly stratified by race, class, and educational advantage, operating in a hierarchy that provides very different types of schools to different types of children.

https://edpolicy.stanford.edu/publications/pubs/1374

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In North Carolina

*Originally published in the News & Observer

© Copyright 2015 Saumya Rastogi | All Rights Reserved.

© Copyright 2015 Saumya Rastogi | All Rights Reserved.

Incidents of school crime and violence, short- and long-term suspensions, alternative learning program placements and corporal punishment were all down last school year. The Department of Public Instruction and school districts have been quick to tout the progress. Teachers and administrators deserve praise for keeping more students in school and out of the school-to-prison pipeline.

However, five serious concerns deserve attention from education administrators, policymakers and lawmakers.

1) Too many students are still being pushed out of school. During 2013-14, North Carolina K-12 public schools handed out 198,254 short-term suspensions, 1,088 long-term suspensions and 37 expulsions. Students missed over 650,000 school days because of out-of-school suspension. Research shows that these students face an increased risk of academic, psychological and behavioral problems, and that suspension brings only negligible benefit to the classroom environment.
(more…)

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